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editors [2009/08/28 21:39]
lastman add missing word "editors", remove "unusually"
editors [2009/08/28 21:43] (current)
lastman add a few missing words to the "Vim" section
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 ===== Vim ===== ===== Vim =====
  
-The one editor that will always be available is vi. In particular, if an embedded Linux has an editor, it is most likely vi. For example, busybox provides the vi editor to uClinux, which runs on the Blackfin. Consequently, we'll give a quick overview of vi, with no insistence that it is the best editor, merely that it is omnipresent. The references at the end of this chapter give more thorough expositions. Also note that GNU version of vi (called vim, but will answer to vi) provides a tutorial. Further, it will operate in what you might consider to be a more friendly fashion than classic vi. If vim is available on your system with its documentation, you can run the tutorial by entering:+The one editor that will always be available is vi. In particular, if an embedded Linux has an editor, it is most likely vi. For example, busybox provides the vi editor to uClinux, which runs on the Blackfin. Consequently, we'll give a quick overview of vi, with no insistence that it is the best editor, merely that it is omnipresent. The references at the end of this chapter give more thorough expositions. Also note that the GNU version of vi (called vim, but will answer to vi) provides a tutorial. Further, it will operate in what you might consider to be a more friendly fashion than classic vi. If vim is available on your system with its documentation, you can run the tutorial by entering:
  
 <code> <code>
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   *insert mode   *insert mode
  
-Upon startup, vi is in command mode. Our approach here will be demonstrate how to edit a file, save it, close it, and then reopen it for subsequent editing. We will not explore vi in any depth.+Upon startup, vi is in command mode. Our approach here will be to demonstrate how to edit a file, save it, close it, and then reopen it for subsequent editing. We will not explore vi in any depth.
  
 ==== Editing a file ==== ==== Editing a file ====